Art Stroll

Art Stroll: Kunsthalle Hamburg Part 2

Last month while going to Germany to teach a workshop I spent a day at the Hamburger Kunsthalle. I loved revisiting the Permanent Collection and see some of my favorites again :)

Max Ernst, Menschliche Figur (Human Figure)  1930 – oil on canvas

I love this painting the shapes the shadows and that you can see the human figure – it is funny and I often smile when I see Max Ernst work.

Max Ernst, Grätenblumen (fishbone flowers) – 1928 – oil on canvas

This is one of my favorite paintings ….like Ever :) Because I remember how excited I was the first time I saw it – the dimensions, the structure, the visual and actual texture and how I couldn’t wait to go home and replicate the look. It was early on in my adventures as a self taught artist and to this day I feel this painting is like a old friend sparking something in me. Yes …I never said I am not a weirdo – hahaha

Paul Klee, Der Goldfisch (The Goldfish), 1925 – Oil and watercolor on paper on cardboard

Another painting that excited me early on – the sgraffito the colors …when I walked into the gallery I almost yelled out “hey fishy” ..but then …the reserved Hamburgers are a bit more suspicious of people bursting out when maybe New Yorkers are – LOL

Paul Klee, Felsige Küste (Rocky Coast) – 1931 – oil on plywood

Love the usage of plywood and the little rectangles – actually it makes me want to do something with the same small pattern but different colors coming together to form a landscape …

btw – the glimpse out of the galleries into the main hall always is a treat :)

Hans Arp, Augen-Nase-Schnurrbart (Eyes, Nose and Moustache) after 1928 – oil on cardboard- artist’s frame

I love the cut shapes and the colors – and reading the title makes me laugh – another outburst tehehehe

Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Wehende Formen (Floating Forms) 1935 – Oil on canvas – artist’s canvas

Oskar Schlemmer, Treppenszene (Stairway scene) 1932 – Oil on fabric on plywood – artist’s frame

This painting makes me want to see the Bauhaus Stairway Painting of his from the same year hanging at MoMA in NYC together with this. Apparently- and I didn’t know this before writing this post – there is some controversy as to how the painting got to be at MoMA.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner – Das Paar vor den Menschen (Two Against The World), 1924 – oil on canvas

I am always fascinated by Kirchner’s paintings- they glow , they are radiant and encapsulate you when you stand in front of them  it is a physical experience.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner – Das Wohnzimmer (The Living Room) – 1923 – Oil on canvas, artist’s frame

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Gut Staberhof (Staberhof Countryseat), 1913  oil on canvas

Love this so much the colors, the shapes …swoon

Emil Nolde, Das Meer VI (The Sea VI), 1915 – oil on canvas

Emil Nolde, Schlepper auf der Elbe (Tugboat on the Elbe) – 1910 – oil on canvas

Max Pechstein, Am Seeufer (On the Banks fo the Lake), 1910

All those paintings make me want to use crazy acidic colors …maybe my love for those colors comes from those artists which I remember being fascinated by in art lessons in school.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Maler und Modell (Painter and Model) – 1910- oil on canvas

Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Das blaue Haus (The Blue House) . 1907 – Oil on canvas – artist’s frame

A gorgeous vibrant painting – with such a beautiful frame. The photo really doesn’t do this beautifully textured impasto painting justice but nonetheless I wanted to show it.

Lyonel Feininger, alte Lokomotive (Old American Locomotive), 1910-1924 – oil on canvas

Loving those figures and the background!

If you think I went home after this …Nope – I couldn’t say bye to Kunsthalle (probably the reason why after 5 years living in the U.S. I am still a member there- LOL.

Another part of this Art Stroll is coming soon- I hope you enjoyed this one.

Comments (2)

  • Sue Clarke

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    I just love Rocky Coast and would be happy to hang it in my living room if the museum no longer has room for it.

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      LOL- me too! Actually I will take any of those if they have no longer room for them hahahaha

      Reply

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Artist Quote of the Week – Max Ernst

Comments (4)

  • anja

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    ha ha quite a quote with the present theme of jumpstart 2018!

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  • stephanie

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    Made me giggle!

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Art Stroll: Max Ernst at MoMA

The week after Christmas or as we Germans say “in the week in between the years” my friend Kim and I finally made it to the Max Ernst Beyond Painting exhibition at MoMA. It was on my bucket list ever since it opened and we just made it as it closed at the end of the year.

The Gramineous Bicycle Garnished with bells the Dappled Fire Damps and the Echinoderms Bending the Spine to Look for Caresses, 1921 – Gouache, ink, and pencil on printed paper

Max Ernst (1891-1976) is a huge inspiration – his art is funny (just read the title for the painting on the top)  and above all- a huge amount of Mixed Media techniques we know are coming from his genius experimentations. Ernst was a key member of the Surrealist movement

The Hat Makes the Man, 1920 – Gouache, pencil, oil and ink on cut-and-pasted printed paper

Here Ernst overpainted a page from a millinery catalogue showing women’s hats

Below are some of Max Ernst’s Frottages

These images are created by placing paper atop of various materials, e.g., wood floorboards, twine, leaves, wire mesh, crumpled paper, crusts of bread, and rubbing the surface with a pencil or crayon.

Inspired by the resulting textures, he added details to transform them into fantastical landscapes, objects and creatures.

Frottage is the french word for rubbing.

Can you see the leave rubbing in the eye?

What an amazing idea to create something new or just start from a blank page.

Max Ernst art work shows over and over again birds.

He also did sculptures- I loved this one so much:

 

Bird Head – 1934-1935  – Bronze

 

Birds above the Forest, 1929 – Oil on Canvas.

Ernst began this painting by scraping pigments across the surface with a toothed plasterer’s comb. This technique is also called Grattage.

There is a similar painting using this technique by Max Ernst in the Kunsthalle in Hamburg – showing flowers made with those grated heads- I just love it so much.

Sun and Forest, 1931 – cut-and-pasted cardboard with oil, gouache, and pencil on paper.

Kim and I called this one donut in a bag.

To the Rendezvous of Friends (The Friends become Flowers, Snakes, and Frogs), 1928 – oil

For this painting, Ernst built up paint in stages, then used grattage or scraping with hard-edged tools like spatulas and palette knives to expose the underlayers and create surface textures where exceptionally fluid paint is pushed to he tool’s edge.

I love this – it is something I sometimes do in my art as well but of course working with acrylic paints, limits the time and amount of layers due to the fast drying time of acrylic paint.

Mundus est Fabula (the world is a story), 1959 – oil on canvas

look at the amazing dimension and depth he created by using a squeege to scrape off the paint – soooo beautiful.

It made me so happy to see it!

Erst also did a lot of book illustrations and I was especially mesmerized by his self invented hieroglyphic script. Isn’t that the coolest?

Another wonderful bronze!

And last but not least those super tiny etchings (about ATC size) with watercolor and ink additions

A wonderful and inspiring Art Stroll for sure. I cannot wait to play with some of the ideas that popped up in my head while looking at his artwork. I hope you enjoyed it as well :)

Comments (2)

  • Sue Clarke

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    The World Is A Story…WOW!
    The “bagel in a bag”…LOL.
    I would love to have that last sculpture in my living room. 0000…so cute.

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      I love that sculpture too – glad I made you smile Sue :)

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Artist Quote of the Week – Max Ernst

MaxErnstQuoteNatKalbach

Comments (1)

  • Gayle

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    Thank you so much sharing your artwork and also your tours of art museums. It’s a real privilege to have a personal virtual tour guide! You’ve certainly expanded my art education.

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