Art Stroll

Art Stroll: Anselm Kiefer at Met Breuer, NYC

While at the Met Breuer I also strolled through the small Anselm Kiefer exhibition because as some of you might know I admire his work so much, the themes, the materials …. Some of the pieces I had just recently seen on an Art Stroll at the Gagosian Gallery , so I am not posting those again, but there were many other pieces that I loved to study.

Broken Flowers and Grass, 1980 – Gouache, acrylic, watercolor and shellac on photograph.

During the 80s Kiefer began reusing earlier self-portraits to create new works. Dressed in a crocheted gown, the artist presented himself as if asleep , but the broken flowers and grass cover his body as if he were dead and buried, the ultimate state of transformation.

The mixture of the photo and the crude painting on top fascinates me.

Aziluth, 2004 – painted photograph and collage on paper

Stunning- and guess how much I wanted to touch this piece. I just love the interplay of photo, collage and painting!

No touching of the one below:

Heavy Cloud, 1985 – Lead and shellac on photograph, mounted on cardboard

Kiefer has often used lead to represent something usually thought to be weightless. Here the title is a pun on “heavy Water” a synonym for radiation in nuclear reactors. Kiefer has pointed out that even though lead is used to “seal radiation” his Heavy Clout has “a radiation leak” symbolized by the yellow shellac streaks seeping form the bottom of the cloud in the direction of the bleak landscape.

Brünnhilde/Grane 1982/93 – Woodcut and acrylic on cut and pasted papers, mounted on canvas

Woodcut is a traditional medium in German art. Kiefer began to experiment with woodblock printing in the early 1970s and returned to it in the late 70s focusing on subjects related to German history and myth. Fo all theGermanic tradition evoked in his turn to the woodcut, his practice was nontraditional in his choice of a larger format and a visibly seamed composition. One of the artist favorite themes at this time was Grane, the sacred steed ridden by Brünnhilde, when she sacrificed herself on Siegfried’s funeral pyre at the close of Wagner’s opera Götterdämmerung.

The texture, the details, and then the size- just amazing!

 

His gigantic paintings are just breath taking- the texture – omg – I could sit in front of this forever. Unfortunately the hallway as the entrance to the exhibition where this was hung was so narrow that it was hard to take the painting in in total. Plus the museum was super crowded …even if not as crowded as in other galleries of the Met Breuer.

It was a very inspiring Art Stroll that let me think about more and different ways to integrate photos, collage and painting …printing …texture …all of it in my work. Hope you enjoyed the stroll as well :)

Comments (4)

  • Seth

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    What? Wait? Kiefer is at the Met Breuer? Who knew? Oh yeah – Nat did. Will have to get there too see this. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      LOL maybe I will ping you next time and we go together ;) It is a small but fine little exhibition – combine it with the MET to make the day worthwhile ;)

      Reply

  • Kathryn Gallanis

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    I too love Anselm Kiefer. Many years ago there was an exhibit of Kiefer’s large works at the Art Institute of Chicago. I was in awe of the scale and texture. There was hay and dirt in one of the works! I had never seen anything like it. The principle that art maybe isn’t supposed to last was also new to me. I went back several times and loved it. Thank you for the great visit.

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      I agree- I love how he is working so much with the concept of transforming art! It must be such an liberating feeling to do art with that concept- I wish I was there yet :) Thank you for joining me on the stroll Kathryn!

      Reply

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Art Stroll Edvard Munch at Met Breuer, NYC

We spend Super Bowl Sunday at the Met Breuer to see “Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed”. Munch  was a young boy when his mother died of tuberculosis; his beloved older sister, Sophie, succumbed to the same disease. He suffered from asthmatic bronchitis and other frequent illnesses, was haunted by depression, and drank and smoked too much. Even without knowing all this his paintings do tell the story.

Death in the Sick-Room, prob. 1893

“I paint not what I see, but what I saw,” Munch once said about his works.

Death Struggle, 1915

Model by the Wicker Chair, 1919 – 1921

Weeping Nude, 19413-14

Jealousy, ca. 1907, oil on canvas

In the doorway at the back of a green wallpapered room, a couple is seen in embrace. The man in the foreground with a whitened face appaears consumed with jealousy in response to the scene behind him. He is presumed to be the poet Stanislaw Przybyszewski and the woman in the background, his wife.

 

 

Despair, 1892

 

Despair, 1894

I loved seeing how in just one year his painting style of the same theme changed- look at the sky, the bridge!

On The Veranda Stairs, 1922 -1924

Veranda views and window views are a reoccurring theme as well .

Starry Night, 1893, oil on canvas

Starry Night, 1922 – 24, oil on canvas

this work belongs to a group of winter views from Munch’s veranda in Ekely. Light from the house creates shadows of the two figures who look out over the dark, snowy landscape.

By the way, both Starry Night paintings weren’t the only ones that left me thinking of Van Gogh, and when I did a little research I realized that wasn’t too far fetched.

“Researchers found, that van Gogh may never have been aware of the Norwegian artist, but that Munch was a great admirer of van Gogh’s work and often tried to emulate his approach.

Seen together, the works show that the artists took similar paths to developing their technical approaches to painting, and also indicate strong thematic affinities. It is also clear that each artist found his own distinct style.”

Sleepless Night, Self Portrait in Inner Turmoil, 1920

Self-Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed” (1940-43).

Man with Bronchitis,1920

“Self Portrait With Bottles,” circa 1938.

By the Window, 1940

I liked this exhibition a lot. An emotional exhibition – you feel the pain conveyed by color and brushstrokes almost physically.

Thanks for joining me on this Art Stroll – I hope you enjoyed it. BTW- you can find all the past Art Strolls here.

Comments (2)

  • Yvonne B.

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    We saw this exhibition in San Francisco last summer–it was fascinating. Loved his self portrait with bottles. Glad you got to enjoy it, too!

    Reply

  • Sue Clarke

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    Sleepless Night is my favorite.
    Having suffered from depression in the past, I can say that he has nailed it in his paintings.

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Art Stroll: Louise Bourgeois at MoMA

A couple of weeks ago Kim and I went to see Max Ernst at MoMA and while we were at it we also went to see the Louise Bourgeois exhibition. Louise Bourgeois was born in 1911 in France and died in 2010 in NYC.

“Spider” (1997), steel, tapestry, wood, glass, fabric, rubber, silver, gold, and bone

Now the reason why I say that in a kind of “well guess we have to”-manner is, that I mostly associated Louise Bourgeois so far with her spider sculptures and well…I am not a particularly big fan of spiders ;)

But I am happy to say I was pleasantly surprised and happy I went to the exhibition! I came to like her work a lot.

Soft Ground and Drypoint etching techniques were a big part of the exhibition.  – and I found her studies of lines very interesting

so did Kim ;)

These prints were actually made in her last two decades of her life and the end of the show in the atrium of MoMA but we started there and it pulled us in to go to the exhibition rooms.

Funny enough a day after we saw the exhibition I got an email from my friend Bruno Nadalin offering a Drypoint Etching Class and needless to say- I signed up – I cannot wait :)

I was fascinated by her organic shapes, the color choices and also the repetition of themes. But when I saw the first piece with fabric I was super intrigued.

Her wood sculptures are beautiful

she also incorporated a lot of architectural symbols in her work

this one is called the Happy House 2001-2003 Drypoint with selective wiping – on the bottom with added pencil and crayons

She also did a series of room- like sculptures called cells in 1991 – about sixty of them. Some are filled with a haunting mix of her personal belonging. She often used the color blue for its serene and calming effect.

Side by Side – Etching with watercolor and gouache addition

more drypoint etching

This is so beautiful until you really explore the shapes and then the Lullaby – as this work is called is starting to be scary!

“You can …remember your life by the shape, the weight, the color, the smell of clothes in your closet” Louise Bourgeois

Although Bourgeois was raised in a family of tapestry restorers, she introduced fabric in her art only when she reached her 80s.

She made prints on fabric napkins, hand towels and even shirt cuffs. She enjoyed the tactile qualities of the surfaces and the ways they absorbed ink.

She also created fabric books, filling the pages with abstract designs fashioned from bits of old garments, stains, scorches and cigarette burns testify to their histories.

Hours of the Day, 2006 – Fabric illustrated book with 25 digital prints

Bourgeois took advantage of digital printing for the ease fo printing on fabric. Every spread has it’s own text as the hour on the clock advances. She was already in her mid nineties when she made this book!

The patterns and colors are just so striking and soothing – I love this and thought of all the fabric pieces that I saved from me great aunt -(an apron, a dress, handkerchiefs) and I thought it would be really cool to make a book out of those pieces – I will chew on it – since my fabric- sewing- skills are …ahem….you know ;)

Stamp of Memories- 1993 – drypoint, with metal stamp additions –

Oh man- I love this so so so much- I cannot even begin to tell you – LOL

Arch of Hysteria, 1993

“My early work is the fear of falling. Later on, it became the art of falling. How to fall without hurting yourself. Later on, it is the art of hanging in there.”

Amazing – I am in awe and I am so glad we went in. It was a very inspiring exhibition making me want to learn more about Louise and her life! Have you been surprised lately by an artist you thought first to be not quite your taste and then starting to be inspired by her/him?

Comments (6)

  • Pam

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    Thank you for sharing, it is delightful to see the exhibits and experience the artists works being shown. If it were not for your posts, I would miss the opportunity to see them. ❤️

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      Wow that was interesting Elizabeth- thank you for sharing.

      Reply

  • Frieda

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    Thanks so much for posting this, Nathalie. I don’t often comment on your posts but always read them, specially the ones abour your museum trips. In this case you inspired me so much that I just had to get the book that accompanies this exhibit. Just wish MOMA was on my doorstep!

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      Thank you so much Frieda! Oh I love that you got the book- I hope you get lots of inspiration out of it. My favorite was really how she used her own clothing to create fabric books- so amazing. Cannot wait to see your magic inspired by it :)

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Art Stroll: Max Ernst at MoMA

The week after Christmas or as we Germans say “in the week in between the years” my friend Kim and I finally made it to the Max Ernst Beyond Painting exhibition at MoMA. It was on my bucket list ever since it opened and we just made it as it closed at the end of the year.

The Gramineous Bicycle Garnished with bells the Dappled Fire Damps and the Echinoderms Bending the Spine to Look for Caresses, 1921 – Gouache, ink, and pencil on printed paper

Max Ernst (1891-1976) is a huge inspiration – his art is funny (just read the title for the painting on the top)  and above all- a huge amount of Mixed Media techniques we know are coming from his genius experimentations. Ernst was a key member of the Surrealist movement

The Hat Makes the Man, 1920 – Gouache, pencil, oil and ink on cut-and-pasted printed paper

Here Ernst overpainted a page from a millinery catalogue showing women’s hats

Below are some of Max Ernst’s Frottages

These images are created by placing paper atop of various materials, e.g., wood floorboards, twine, leaves, wire mesh, crumpled paper, crusts of bread, and rubbing the surface with a pencil or crayon.

Inspired by the resulting textures, he added details to transform them into fantastical landscapes, objects and creatures.

Frottage is the french word for rubbing.

Can you see the leave rubbing in the eye?

What an amazing idea to create something new or just start from a blank page.

Max Ernst art work shows over and over again birds.

He also did sculptures- I loved this one so much:

 

Bird Head – 1934-1935  – Bronze

 

Birds above the Forest, 1929 – Oil on Canvas.

Ernst began this painting by scraping pigments across the surface with a toothed plasterer’s comb. This technique is also called Grattage.

There is a similar painting using this technique by Max Ernst in the Kunsthalle in Hamburg – showing flowers made with those grated heads- I just love it so much.

Sun and Forest, 1931 – cut-and-pasted cardboard with oil, gouache, and pencil on paper.

Kim and I called this one donut in a bag.

To the Rendezvous of Friends (The Friends become Flowers, Snakes, and Frogs), 1928 – oil

For this painting, Ernst built up paint in stages, then used grattage or scraping with hard-edged tools like spatulas and palette knives to expose the underlayers and create surface textures where exceptionally fluid paint is pushed to he tool’s edge.

I love this – it is something I sometimes do in my art as well but of course working with acrylic paints, limits the time and amount of layers due to the fast drying time of acrylic paint.

Mundus est Fabula (the world is a story), 1959 – oil on canvas

look at the amazing dimension and depth he created by using a squeege to scrape off the paint – soooo beautiful.

It made me so happy to see it!

Erst also did a lot of book illustrations and I was especially mesmerized by his self invented hieroglyphic script. Isn’t that the coolest?

Another wonderful bronze!

And last but not least those super tiny etchings (about ATC size) with watercolor and ink additions

A wonderful and inspiring Art Stroll for sure. I cannot wait to play with some of the ideas that popped up in my head while looking at his artwork. I hope you enjoyed it as well :)

Comments (2)

  • Sue Clarke

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    The World Is A Story…WOW!
    The “bagel in a bag”…LOL.
    I would love to have that last sculpture in my living room. 0000…so cute.

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      I love that sculpture too – glad I made you smile Sue :)

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Art Stroll: Creating a Modern Guggenheim, Guggenheim NYC

A couple weeks ago when my godson visited we went to the Guggenheim Museum. The exhibition Creating a Modern Guggenheim showed a collection of Modern Artwork by six major art patrons. I thought it was a great way to have a walk through Modern Art and major Modern Artists and see if my young visitor would enjoy it.

He totally enjoyed the building – which I love myself very much.

And what a wonderful environment for this beautiful Calder Mobile!

It was fun to see more Calder Mobiles after just having been to the Whitney Exhibition on Calder.

What I loved about the collection was that there was a lot of early works by famous modern artists displayed and it was wonderful to see how from those early works they developed their distinctive styles later or dabbled in different areas – for some it felt as if you saw a study of their later work.

Two Kandinsky’s – the top one from 1913 and the one below from 1936. I loved seeing those two and see how his artwork was still the same and yet changed.

Which one of the two do you like better?

Beautiful van Gogh – It makes me want to try this swirly impasto style with some of the landscapes I saw during my recent travels through the Southwest.

An early Gaugin

An early Henri Rousseau – so tamed and restricted- I love his later paintings so much more. check him out!

Picasso -my godson did not like this at all – I could tell he wasn’t that much into cubism in the first place but all the earth tone colors totally put him off.

an early Robert Delaunay – gosh I love this one – and wow so different from his circular colorful forms later

Fernand Leger – above and below also dabbling in the style of cubism of the time and then later finding his own cubism style.

Here is a later one below

A Chagall below- …the colors are so obviously him

but the subject and painting itself …interesting …

This one by him I love love love! I cannot stop looking at all the details!

An early Piet Mondrian – uniquely his style but not yet at the primary color grid.

It was a massive collection of paintings and while I enjoyed it I would have loved staying longer or listening to the audio explanations of some but …there is only that much time a 17 year old wants to spent at a museum ;)  He wanted to go and I wanted to make sure he would not regret that by being held hostage there for longer than he wanted – hahahah ;) Hope you enjoyed the little Art Stroll.

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Art Stroll: Max Pechstein in Brucerius Kunst Forum

When I visited my home city Hamburg in Germany my friends and I spent a couple hours in the Brucerius Kunst Forum to see the Max Pechstein exhibition. Max Pechstein was an expressionist German painter, who was part of the Art Group “Die Brücke”

He was highly influenced by the ideas and techniques of Van Gogh, Matisse and the Fauves. In the 30s Max Pechstein was vilified by the Nazis and most of his paintings were removed from German Museums and some of them displayed in the degenerate art exhibition of 1937. He was dismissed as an art professor by the Nazis and was only after World War II able again to teach art.

1912 – he dabbled a bit in cubism. I love how he painted the patterns and his usage of colors.

Pechstein was also a really good printmaker – and he seemed to have used any kind of paper he could find to do his prints.

I love the texture of the wood grain visible in his prints.

He loved painting his first wive Lotte- below in a painting which reminds a bit of Gaugin.

While his style seemed to change all the time – his use of color was very unique and consistent.

“Early Morning” – Oil on Canvas – he picked up the curves of his wife’s body in the landscape in the background.

Nidden Coastline with Fishing Boats – so very different yet again.

Fisher Boat – 1913

Monterosso el Mare, 1924

Amazing painting- it somehow reminded me a of painting by Max Beckmann of seals in a circus.

 

Sitting young man

Printed Christmas Cards showing him, his wife and his son – 1916

Sleeping Nude and Cat (1911) was one of my favorite paintings of his.

Kurenkähne am Deich, 1920 – watercolor and pencil – one of the few non-oil paintings.

Fischer Katen – 1932 – This shows the typical style of houses in the North of Germany .

And this one just glowed intensely and beautifully – a stunning piece. Sunset – 1921

and here are my friends Sandra and Liz who joined my this Art Stroll. Hope you enjoyed it :)

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Art Stroll: Murals in Jersey City Part 1

Lots of times my husband and I do a little bicycle tour in Jersey City, either through the neighborhood or Liberty State Park. Recently we set out on the hunt for some murals we haven’t seen yet.

I like this one by Sam Pullin aka Bed Bugs in Love. It shows the Golden Record aboard the Voyager. Sam is a JC local and I am always excited when I see work by him because I know him :)

Emilio Florentine created this mural called “Turnt Up” . On his website it says “His paintings are based on the belief that natural beauty is heightened during chaos. By using impressionist and surrealist techniques, he exploits, tortures, and then paints his subject – the flower – at its tipping point”

This mural was huge and impressive and also on a really amazing building. The Peach Tree War by Distort. While we were looking at the mural we met another couple also checking out the mural and we agreed that all those different murals in Jersey City are an amazing reason for a bike ride . It is so much fun to go on the hunt for them.

This cool lion is by Davel who is from Miami. Check out his cool prints!

Top and bottom are by Kaos & Klive

wow- the lettering and colors are so amazeballs!

Aqualand was created by Catherine Hart.

On the left by Jerkface and on the right by Zimer. Love those two together :)

It’s Your World by Chris Stain and Billy Mode. This is one of my favorites!

I hope you had fun on this Art Stroll to see some Murals in Jersey City. I hope to show you another part soon …but since my husband’s bike just got stolen, that will have to wait a little bit (sniff).

Comments (2)

  • Sue Clarke

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    Turnt Up is amazing and I could look at it for a long time!
    So sorry to hear about your hubby’s bike and I hope it somehow “finds” its way home.

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      Sue – i love that one too! The bike did not find it’s way home …unfortunately it has been a big thing recently in our neighborhood. Hope you have a wonderful weekend

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Art Stroll: Medrie MacPhee at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery

Natalya Aikens and I did a little gallery tour a couple weeks ago and we also stopped by to see Medrie MacPhee at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in NYC.

Her artwork were Collages made out of pieces of clothes and oil paint.

I liked how the collages seemed like maps of some sort and how the flatness is interrupted with pieces of cloths which you start to diessect and try to read.

 

Buttons, pockets, seams and zippers.

Medrie McPhee also uses dried acrylic skins and applies them as elements into her work. She calls those acrylic transfers.

I find the collages intriguing, at first glance it feels as if they invite you to linger and to try to make sense of these maps.

And then I start to feel annoyed because there seems to be not enough to get a grip on it. I need the code:)

It was definitely great to go on an art stroll with Natalya again. It also reminded me that I should visit galleries more often :) Thanks Natalya – cannot wait for our next outing!

Comments (4)

  • Karen Bearse

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    Interesting my creative wheels started spinning right away!

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  • Jean Goza

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    Fascinating. As a sewist and fabric lover, I really enjoyed seeing the “components” of fashion broken down in a very simple form. With the addition of paint, it changed the form to collage. It did indeed look like a road map. For me, the map led me to bounce between what was and what is. I love the unique vision of this artist.

    Thanks Nat for another fun art stroll.

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

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      So glad you liked this stroll Jean and I love how you described what you see and think then looking at the artwork. Thank you for sharing!

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Art Stroll: Anselm Kiefer – Transition From Cool To Warm

A couple days ago my artist friend Natalya Aikens and I went into the city to go to the Gagosian Gallery to see Anselm Kiefer‘s work. If you participated in Creative Jumpstart 2016,  you know that Kiefer is one of my all time favorite artists. When Natalya told me about this exhibition I was crazy excited – and I wasn’t disappointed.

Kiefer is mostly known for his gigantic textured paintings, but he also paints with watercolor on a smaller scale and this exhibition at the Gagosian Gallery shows those two different bodies of works. It fits since Kiefer is interested in opposites.

Anselm Kiefer, For Segantini: die bösen Mütter (For Segantini: The Bad Mothers), 2011–12, oil, emulsion, acrylic, shellac, wood, metal, lead, and sediment of an electrolysis on canvas.

I love how Kiefer incorporates all kinds of materials and he doesn’t really care that a painting could change through aging, or natural alterations. In fact he welcomes this. He says he is more interested in the process – not only the process of making art but also the process of what happens to a painting naturally later – than in an absolute result. I think this is a totally freeing, interesting and open minded approach to art and life.

Anselm Kiefer aller Tage Abend, aller Abende Tag (The Evening of All Days, the Day of All Evenings), 2014 Watercolor on paper

Anselm Kiefer Ignis sacer, 2016 Oil, acrylic, and emulsion on canvas

Anselm Kiefer des Malers Atelier (The Painter’s Studio), 2016 Oil, emulsion, acrylic, and shellac on canvas

What I found interesting about his watercolor work was how freely he uses the colors, letting them do their thing – something I struggle with then using this paint medium.

Anselm Kiefer Des Meeres und der Liebe Wellen (The Waves of Sea and Love), 2017 Oil, emulsion, acrylic, and lead on canvas

Look at Natalya taking a picture of me taking picture of her in front of a picture …well – hey … little bit of fun is ok ;)

For this painting Kiefer poured liquid lead on top of a painting and then pealed it back to reveal the original painting again.

Kiefer also makes a huge amount of Artist Books. He is fascinated by books and stories, they have always played a huge role in his artwork.

In an interview he once told the interviewer that he starts his morning by going into his library and in a state of still being absence, he blindly grabs a book which usually turns out to be just the right book for the day and often inspires him for his artwork.

These books are quite big – which is hard to see in these photos  – they are more sculptural than books and you are tempted to touch them and flip the pages, although given how heavy they look that might be something you need more arm muscles …and you might never be able to set foot in this gallery again ;)

I love the marbling effects Kiefer created – with plaster – maybe gesso and watercolor.

Klingsor’s Garden was the room with all those books called. Klingsor is a magician in the opera Parsifal. He has a garden full of beautiful flower maids.

The way those books are set up is like a labyrinth and I guess it is no coincidence that you might get lost in looking at those books from all angles.

Fascinating!

Anselm Kiefer, Und Du bist doch Maler geworden (and you became a painter nethertheless)

I didn’t see it in the gallery as this is a huge painting but when I actually took a look at the photo of the painting at home I realized there is painter’s palette carved into the painting – a painting about painting.

Anselm Kiefer, Aurora, 2015–17, oil, emulsion, acrylic, shellac, and sediment of an electrolysis on canvas

The texture and dimension in his work is just unreal . You have to see his work in person.

Given that this painting is so new- I would bet that it is still changing, drying, and processing. Now …if that is what the artist likes and wants… who are we to preserve it and have conservators going nuts about up-keeping the status quo?

When I first looked at Kiefer’s watercolors I thought they were so different to his big paintings because of the missing texture but the closer I looked, the more I realized that he actually included a lot of texture with charcoal in some of them – and then there is also a lot of visual texture especially in the one above. But even the ones I showed earlier in this post have areas of texture quite unusual for watercolor painting.

In one of the videos I saw a while back about Kiefer’s work I saw him hacking with a machete into his thickly layered painting. Big pieces of paint chips fly off the canvas, revealing yet even still thick layers of paint underneath. There was something so liberating and yet shocking seeing his actions.

I love the beauty that get’s revealed by the act of slashing, scraping and peeling.

I also loved how some of the books had these raw edges – and as a viewer who always makes up their own story when looking at artwork for me Kiefer’s work is about human beings.

We are complicated, controversial, complex, layered, good and bad, we change, we can transform. Behind all the ugliness of human beings are always layers of beauty. There are no monsters and that is for me what explains why people can be horrible and cruel but then also be loving and like-able. That is what in my eyes his artwork represents.

This exhibition has inspired me to no end – lot’s of thoughts, ideas, craving to explore. If you are in NYC – check this exhibition out– it got extended and it is open until September 1st. Don’t be intimidated that it is a gallery – the people at the desk barely lift their head when you come in- they know you are not there to buy but it seemed utterly fine for them and I think Kiefer approves ;)

Comments (4)

  • Janis Loehr

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    Thank you Nathalie for sharing!

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  • stephanie

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    What an amazing exhibit!

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