Inspirational Video

Nat’s Spring Pattern Fun – Video 8-14 Recap

When I received my new RubberMoon Stamp Designs I once again couldn’t stop making samples and patterns (remember last year’s April Patterns — well it happened again this year lol). I decided to record a short video for some of them and post them on my Instagram.

These videos are short and sweet – You can see what I use and how I pull the pattern together. I hope it inspires you to give some of them a try and maybe come up with your own too.

Here is a recap of Patterns 8-14 – I hope you enjoy :)


Pattern 08: First up is a simple linear pattern using my Mini Motifs and Fan-fare stamp sets. 2 colors + 2 stamps = Pattern Success

 

Pattern 09: Next up is another duo – I love when stuff fits nicely together and that is the key with this pattern. I’m using one stamp from my Hex Set Small along with one stamp from my Triangle Love set. 

 

Pattern 10: How about Diamonds and … Pearls? I made this pattern with one of my Triangle Love stamps and one of my Small Circle Jumble stamps.

 

Pattern 11: Another fits-just-right combo is my Solid Hex Large with my Triangle Love stamps overtop. This pattern also has a stamp from my Floral Tile Small set in there too. Hexes, triangles, and squares.

 

Pattern 12: Balancing delicate and bold is a winning strategy for patterns. In this one I use some stamps from my Mini Motifs set and the Solid Triangle Large stamp from my Triangle Love set.

 

Pattern 13: My Triangle Love stamps are also designed to play really well with my Hex Set Large rubber stamps: the sides of the triangles are the same length as that of the hexes. Look how that can translate into a great field of pattern!

 

Pattern 14: How easy is it? All you need is a couple triangle stamps and 2 different ink colors to make a field of pattern.


Here are some of the stamps I used for these patterns:

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Artist in Residence – Interview with Natalya Khorover

Today I am sharing an interview I did with artist Natalya Khorover. This is an interview series I am calling Artist in Residence.

I heard this great quote on the web recently: “On the bright side, I am no longer calling this shelter-in-place. I am now an artist-in-residence.” It got me thinking about how times of adversity and challenge are often what inspire action and creation for us artists.

I decided to seek out some peers whom I admire and ask them how they are using this time to be working artists. What has changed for them? Where are they finding room to create at home if they previously worked in an offsite studio, out-of-doors, or are now sharing a home studio with other working-from-home family members? What are they creating now – is it influenced by the current situation or on a similar path as before? Are they feeling called to action or struggling to create?

Everyone is responding differently to this crisis. Let’s learn how others are coping with their new status as Artists in Residence.

 

A little bit about this video:

I have known Natalya for quite some time now and I love her “architecturally inspired” artwork and the unique materials that she uses. In this interview, Natalya talks about the changes in her routines and side gigs due to the pandemic, her commissioned Home Portrait artworks for clients that involve the use of personal and meaningful ephemera, and the challenge of more unusual commissions. Natalya also describes how her love of cities influences her chosen subject matter, the reasons behind her use of plastic bags, an unfortunately interrupted post as a visiting artist at a local school, and how mask making helped her emotionally handle the crisis. She also shares a sneak peek of a large project she is currently working on and insightful glimpses of her process and studio.

You can learn more about Natalya here on her website: https://www.artbynatalya.com and here on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artbynatalya/

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Artist in Residence – Interview with Grant Hardeway

Today I am sharing an interview I did with Jersey City writer and photographer Grant Hardeway. This is a new interview series I am calling Artist in Residence.

I heard this great quote on the web recently: “On the bright side, I am no longer calling this shelter-in-place. I am now an artist-in-residence.” It got me thinking about how times of adversity and challenge are often what inspire action and creation for us artists.

I decided to seek out some peers whom I admire and ask them how they are using this time to be working artists. What has changed for them? Where are they finding room to create at home if they previously worked in an offsite studio, out-of-doors, or are now sharing a home studio with other working-from-home family members? What are they creating now – is it influenced by the current situation or on a similar path as before? Are they feeling called to action or struggling to create?

Everyone is responding differently to this crisis. Let’s learn how others are coping with their new status as Artists in Residence.

 

A little bit about this video: Grant Hardeway is a photographer who lives and works in Jersey City, and whose work I found on instagram. In this interview Grant discusses his earliest artistic project (an art class stunt that turned out pretty successful), the importance of intention when he’s photographing the world, and his reluctance to call himself a photographer. He talks about using both film and digital, his love of composition and light, and the power of photos to evoke a mood or feeling and a memory of another time and place. We discuss the duty that artists have to document life (especially during crisis times like today) and also the importance of slowing down and being more aware of life. Grant is a very thoughtful person and I absolutely loved speaking with him. I hope you enjoy!

You can learn more about Grant and see his gorgeous work at: https://www.instagram.com/digital_taxidermy/

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Artist in Residence – Interview with Mario Robinson

Today I am sharing an interview I did with watercolor artist Mario Robinson. This is a new interview series I am calling Artist in Residence.

I heard this great quote on the web recently: “On the bright side, I am no longer calling this shelter-in-place. I am now an artist-in-residence.” It got me thinking about how times of adversity and challenge are often what inspire action and creation for us artists.

I decided to seek out some peers whom I admire and ask them how they are using this time to be working artists. What has changed for them? Where are they finding room to create at home if they previously worked in an offsite studio, out-of-doors, or are now sharing a home studio with other working-from-home family members? What are they creating now – is it influenced by the current situation or on a similar path as before? Are they feeling called to action or struggling to create?

Everyone is responding differently to this crisis. Let’s learn how others are coping with their new status as Artists in Residence.

 

A little bit about this video: I met Mario years ago through our work with Winsor Newton/Liquitex and I always love catching up with him. He is a super talented watercolor artist and just a great friend to chat with about all things art related and beyond. In this interview, Mario talks about a recent move, the positive side to disruptions in artmaking, his changing source of inspiration and artistic drive, and dealing with the emotional weight of the global pandemic. Mario discusses his craft as a watercolor artist, the challenges of working big showing us his unbelievably cool and mind blowing project he is working on, and the role that the arts community is playing these days to help the world cope.

You can learn more about Mario here on his website: https://www.marioarobinson.com and here on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marioarobinson/

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Artist in Residence – Interview with Danny Gregory

Today I am sharing an interview I did with author, educator, and artist Danny Gregory. This is a new interview series I am calling Artist in Residence.

I heard this great quote on the web recently: “On the bright side, I am no longer calling this shelter-in-place. I am now an artist-in-residence.” It got me thinking about how times of adversity and challenge are often what inspire action and creation for us artists.

I decided to seek out some peers whom I admire and ask them how they are using this time to be working artists. What has changed for them? Where are they finding room to create at home if they previously worked in an offsite studio, out-of-doors, or are now sharing a home studio with other working-from-home family members? What are they creating now – is it influenced by the current situation or on a similar path as before? Are they feeling called to action or struggling to create?

Everyone is responding differently to this crisis. Let’s learn how others are coping with their new status as Artists in Residence.

 

A little bit about this video: I met Danny through Sketchbook Skool, his online educational platform that is a great resource for workshops, inspiration and advice. In this interview Danny talks about his experience sheltering in a state other than his own, cobbling together art supplies to continue his practice (including a surprising donation of supplies from a Sketchbook Skool student coming to the rescue), and using technology to fill in the gaps. He discusses the changing nature of his online business in response to the situation and the increasing need for online support communities and the responsibility he feels towards artists and their personal growth. We talk about talent, obstacles, motivation, and hard work. We do a bit of joking too, so definitely tune in until the end.

You can learn more about Danny (including a link to Sketchbook Skool) here: https://www.instagram.com/dannyobadiah/

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Artist in Residence – Interview with Jimmy Leslie

Today I am sharing an interview I did with artist Jimmy Leslie. This is a new interview series I am calling Artist in Residence.

I heard this great quote on the web recently: “On the bright side, I am no longer calling this shelter-in-place. I am now an artist-in-residence.” It got me thinking about how times of adversity and challenge are often what inspire action and creation for us artists.

I decided to seek out some peers whom I admire and ask them how they are using this time to be working artists. What has changed for them? Where are they finding room to create at home if they previously worked in an offsite studio, out-of-doors, or are now sharing a home studio with other working-from-home family members? What are they creating now – is it influenced by the current situation or on a similar path as before? Are they feeling called to action or struggling to create?

Everyone is responding differently to this crisis. Let’s learn how others are coping with their new status as Artists in Residence.

 

A little bit about this video: I met Jimmy years ago at a trade show in Germany and have enjoyed ever since following his art, working on special projects with him, and just being friends with such an enthusiastic and supportive person. In this interview, Jimmy talks about his role as a Resident Artist for an art materials company, his passion for sharing his artistic knowledge in a judgement-free way, and the variety in his day-today activities as a working artist. He discusses the ups and downs of putting yourself out there and connecting through technology, the challenges that artists can face with creating in this climate of crisis, and his own artistic journey that is ongoing. We chat about inspiration, working in sketchbooks, and the benefits of working with different media.

You can learn more about Jimmy and see his gorgeous work at: https://www.instagram.com/jimmyleslieart/

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Artist in Residence – Interview with John DuVal

Today I am sharing an interview I did with friend and watercolor artist John DuVal. This is a new interview series I am calling Artist in Residence.

I heard this great quote on the web recently: “On the bright side, I am no longer calling this shelter-in-place. I am now an artist-in-residence.” It got me thinking about how times of adversity and challenge are often what inspire action and creation for us artists.

I decided to seek out some peers whom I admire and ask them how they are using this time to be working artists. What has changed for them? Where are they finding room to create at home if they previously worked in an offsite studio, out-of-doors, or are now sharing a home studio with other working-from-home family members? What are they creating now – is it influenced by the current situation or on a similar path as before? Are they feeling called to action or struggling to create?

Everyone is responding differently to this crisis. Let’s learn how others are coping with their new status as Artists in Residence.

 

A little bit about this video:  John DuVal is a very talented watercolor artist who paints urban landscapes and dabbles in other media as well. He is a teacher at the Jersey City Art School and also a teacher on Creative JumpStart. In this interview John discusses the challenges of now working on his artwork at home, away from his regular studio, including working at a smaller scale, choosing specific materials that can be taken out and packed away more easily, and dealing with lighting issues. He also talks about using technology and how that has become a new way for him to more easily create as he works as an artist from home, but also discusses it as a double edged sword and is careful with how he lets technology influence his practice as an artist.

You can learn more about John and see his gorgeous work at: https://www.instagram.com/duval.artist/

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Nat’s Spring Pattern Fun – Video 1-7 Recap

When I received my new RubberMoon Stamp Designs I once again couldn’t stop making samples and patterns (remember last year’s April Patterns — well it happened again this year lol). I decided to record a short video for some of them and post them on my Instagram.

These videos are short and sweet – You can see what I use and how I pull the pattern together. I hope it inspires you to give some of them a try and maybe come up with your own too.

Here is a recap of Patterns 1-7 – I hope you enjoy :)


First up is a simple but very bold pattern using the Empire Triangle stamp from my Triangle Love stamp set:

 

Video 02 is a super easy pattern using my Stained Glass Triangle from my Triangle Love stamp set:

 

Next up is an argyle style diamond pattern using my Star Triangle stamp from my Triangle Love stamp set:

 

Video 04 is using my Sunburst Triangle stamp from the Triangle Love set to create hexagons:

 

Video 05 shows 2 border patterns and a loose field of pattern, all using stamps from the Triangle Love Set:

 

Next up is a pattern using my Mini Motifs stamp set – 3 stamps from that set that fit nicely together:

 

Video 07 is using the Tulip Triangle from my Triangle Love set and it is neat to watch the hexagon transform into a star and then into a larger hexagon:

Here are some of the stamps I used for these patterns:

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Art Journal Flip Through – March 2020

I wanted to share a little Flip Through video of my newly finished art journal. 

I keep about 4-5 journals at the same time so they are always filled with an eclectic mix. This one highlights some pages I made using my last batch of new stencil designs as well as some pages that you may recognize from some of my Online Workshops.

Do you keep several art journals at once or do you work through one at a time?

Comments (2)

  • Christine Kiehl

    |

    Loved the journal flip through. I like the style you mostly used with this one. I keep several journals at a time also. Not all of them are art based. I love to create with words mostly. Happy March! Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

    • Nathalie Kalbach

      |

      Thank you so much Christine! So interesting to hear that you also have several journals! Happy March to you too!!!

      Reply

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